Klaus

First, I want to say hello to all the new readers that follow this blog. Hello, and thanks for reading! I have surpassed 900 followers recently, and that makes me very happy. Welcome aboard!

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Volume 1 Artwork (The artwork is amazing!)

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The cover of the volume I picked up.

I have written a fair deal on this blog about storytelling. It should not come as a surprise to anyone that I am fascinated by the process as well as the actual art of it. I mean, I am a fiction writer after all. It seems like a prerequisite to be a writer that first; you must be a voracious consumer of stories in whatever form. Whether novels, comics, movies, and/or games, you have to go through a lot of stories.

At a certain point, at least if you are anything like me, you have a whole set of ideas floating around in your head just waiting to to be stitched together. Your own stories start to percolate and mature, and the writing begins.

But this post isn’t about writing, but about one particular story. Every so often a story comes along that just really kicks you in both the heart and the head. Something you identify with strongly, and that relates so strongly to the world you live it that it leaves you reeling. This is a post about one such story, which happens to be in graphic novel form.

However, I want to say a few things before I get to that; because hopefully it will explain a little of why this story hit me so hard. It is also no secret that I am still in processing mode with the recent election and other events in the world; such as Standing Rock. There has been a lot of questioning for me in the recent days.

I was a strong Sanders supporter. Even though I am young, I have never had a candidate speak to my values and ideals as closely as he did. I remember thinking to myself, that was the kind of revolution I can get behind. One that shakes up both our culture and our society, one that refocuses all these things in the direction of social democracy. I could support something like that.

Yet, I have to face facts. That is not the way things went with this election. If I may be a little biased for a second, I think we elected a straight up tyrant. Several people have called him a fascist. I say if the boot fits…

I have also said that if his campaign is any indicator, a lot of people are going to be in harm’s way. Hell, at least one person I highly respect has already been attacked in Trump’s name.

All of this has left me with more questions than answers. Questions about the Democrats, questions about the media, questions about America in general.

Which brings to mind all the stories that have really inspired me. Stories like Star Wars, in which rebels fight against an evil ruler and Empire.

Which brings me to the story I wanted to talk about today. It is a graphic novel called Klaus, by Grant Morrison and Dan Mora. At the basic level, this is a reinvented and retelling of Santa Claus, but done in a beautiful and imaginative way that is filled with shamanism and Viking-ness.

It is the story of Klaus, who is a man of the wild, a hunter. He comes into a town to sell his furs, and comes to realize the Baron of the town is an evil man. Klaus is assaulted outside a tavern, basically for being an outsider. He also sees the town guards assault a small child, and he learns that Baron has taken all the toys and joy generally out of the town.

So Klaus is sent from the village, bleeding and battered. The guards make a sport of it, and chase after him. He is shot with at least one arrow, and left for dead. The guards corner him and come in for the kill. That is when we first meet his companion, Lilli, a great white wolf, who makes short work of the guards.

Later on in the story, we learn that the Baron has made a deal with the Krampus. He oppresses the people of the village, works them day and night in a coal mine, where the Krampus is buried. You know, basic deal with the devil stuff.

Shamanism, Viking-ness, white wolves, a fight against an oppressive tyrant and an evil demon, found in a coal (fossil fuel) mine?

It is not my place to tell you the whole story, but it struck me right in the heart strings. There are enough parallels between Klaus, his wolf companion, the world as well as myself that it certainly made an impression.

I have written many times before how I have two spirit companions that are Arctic Wolves, white as the new fallen snow (Well, the male does actually have darker spots). I am also a hunter and outdoorsman myself, and work with Skaði, who also is commonly pictured with a great white wolf.

Did I ever say that naming my shop The White Wolf was no coincidence?

What is even funnier, is that my current Dnd character started (I say started because there have been both hair color and sex changes recently..) as basically the character in the book, except a little older and with white hair. A ranger/shaman hybrid with a wolf companion.

Side note: No, I do not base my Dnd characters on some idealized version of myself… Okay maybe I do. Maybe I see a lot of myself in Klaus, though he is significantly more beefcake than I will ever be. Alas.

In addition, Klaus is in fact a Germanic shortform of my name, Nicholas. Nicholas is a Greek name that means “victory of the people”. This fact is actually pointed out in the book, as Klaus continues his transition from wild man to hero of the people, and eventually Santa Claus himself.

I don’t really think I really need to harp on that point any more. But I did want to circle back to the original point of this post. The strange influence stories have on our reality, and how they teach lessons in the most unexpected ways.

I hope it is clear why this story resonated so strongly with me, and there are certainly some lessons here about the current state of the world.

In the story, one of the chief “bad guys” comes from a coal mine. I think there is some important lessons there about our use of fossil fuels, as well as the ongoing situation at Standing Rock. I think we should be resisting “the creature in the coal mine”, given how toxic fossil fuels are for our world. I think we as a society should do everything in our power to resist the Black Snake, and at the same time build a more environmentally friendly and sustainable future.

I think there are important lessons here as well when it comes to oppressive governments and tyrants. The hero in the story fights with sword and magic to be sure (because comic book hero), but also with the support of the people. In a way, he leads a people’s revolt against both a tyrannical government as well as the beast in the coal mine.

To be fair, he is Santa Claus at the end of the day.

Thanks for reading!

 

 

Here is a link to this book on Amazon for reference. There are single issues, but the volume I got is seven in all.

Naturally, I would say support your local comic book store.

Apparently, this has been published this month. Per Amazon’s date, it had been out 4 days when I picked it up. 🙂

https://www.amazon.com/Klaus-Grant-Morrison/dp/1608869032

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About Nicholas Haney

I am a writer, author, hunter, craftsman, and student of anthropology/archaeology. View all posts by Nicholas Haney

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